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Watch a Quiet Video of Glowing Synchronous Fireflies

With summer upon us, many are longing for those quintessential outside summer activities—like watching fireflies. Or, depending where you’re from, lightning bugs. Well, now you can do the next best thing and watch a stream of fireflies from the comfort of your own home. Thanks to the nonprofit organization Discover Life in America (DLiA) and firefly photographer Radim Schreiber many were able to enjoy a livestream of the famous synchronous fireflies from the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

The sparkling display is enough to make anyone long for a summer night in nature.

If it’s different than other fireflies you’ve seen, it’s because these particular fireflies synchronize their lights. They flash in a kind of harmony as they mate. Time Out says, “World-famous synchronous fireflies (Photinus carolinus) as well as blue ghosts (Phausis reticulata) and other firefly species native to the Smokies region are one of at least 19 species of fireflies that live in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Each year the fireflies put on a synchronous light display in order to find a mate. They are the only species in America whose individuals can synchronize their flashing light patterns.”

The 32 minute stream (watch above) began with an introduction by Knoxville radio journalist and DLiA board member Chrissy Keuper. DLiA director of science and research Dr. Will Kuhn followed with a comprehensive presentation. And then it’s a soothing 15 minute video of a babbling brook at dusk complete with fireflies galore.

Synchronous fireflies

DLIA

Discover Life in America is a non-profit partner of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The organization works to understand and promote the rich biological diversity of the Smokies. This video is available for free, but viewers can donate to help DLiA continue its biodiversity work. While National Parks around the country are beginning to open up, this video will be playing on repeat until we can schedule a trip.

Featured Image: DLIA