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Bill Nye’s Temporary Hotline Helps People Deal with ‘Scary’ Things
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Is there anything in your life that’s currently frightening you and/or making you feel like you’re in danger? If the answer to that question is yes, then you may want to call Bill Nye’s temporary hotline. The number to call is 470-ASK-BILL—or 470-275-2455—and even if you don’t manage to find a resolution to your current issues, you’ll at least be treated to some quality infotainment podcast.

Nye, who’s always in the news for clearing up scientific misconceptions (or demonstrating what not to do when encountering twerking people), recently launched the hotline via his twitter account, noting that he and his podcast guests will quell listeners’ fears by telling them “how risky [their issue] really is,” presumably by using estimated probabilities of a given dangerous event occurring.

When you call in you may get a busy signal, which means the Q&A podcast has ended for the day. During the few minutes we were on the phone while the podcast was still ongoing, we heard what sounded like a discussion of broad scientific concepts—which means that even though Nye is calling for “any questions about sickness, health and your relationship with your germs…” you should still expect Nye’s standard (very entertaining) scientifically focused answers. Even if people are not asking very scientific questions.

Nye’s Q&A sessions will be happening on the days listed in the tweet above, although you should definitely call in immediately at the start times listed if you want help resolving an issue. It’s unclear what time each session ends, and considering Nye’s Twitter following is roughly 5.9 million strong, there’ll likely be no shortage of vexed callers.

What do you think of Bill Nye hosting his own Q&A hotline? Do you think this call-in podcast can help to clear up a lot of scientific misconceptions or do you think this kind of thing could go off the rails very quickly? Give us your thoughts in the comments below!

Feature image: The Triton