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Netflix’s IO Trailer Pits Anthony Mackie Against a Toxic Earth

Netflix’s IO Trailer Pits Anthony Mackie Against a Toxic Earth

Netflix has been offering up an impressive roster of original movies of late (Bird Box sure is doing well, eh?) and their newest is the dystopian sci-fi flick Io starring Anthony Mackie and Margaret Qualley as two of the last known people on an Earth devastated by some kind of environmental disaster. Today the streaming service released the first trailer for the bleak and beautiful looking film and it offers up an intriguing look at director Jonathan Helpert’s end of the world flick.

The movie focuses on Micah and Sam, two people on the toxic remains of Earth. It looks like an epic tale which centers on the characters as they try to catch the last shuttle off the barren planet to the safe haven of Jupiter’s moon Io. The trailer gives us a glimpse of the dead planet and the struggles of the people left there. From what we see here IO seems to be a sci-fi film about finding humanity, companionship and hope in the face of utter disaster.

In a recent interview with Mackie, he told us that he thinks one of the most exciting things about the project is the way that it allows the viewer to be a part of the story. “As an audience member you get the opportunity to discover with us and to go on this journey with us, so I feel like with that the movie gives you the old school experience of being an audience member. I feel like when you spoon feed the audience you let them off the hook and we don’t do that. You really have to pay attention and go on the journey with us, which makes it this really fun realm to play in.”

We’ll definitely be tuning in when the film hits Netflix on January 18th.

Images: Netflix

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