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Jason Momoa Calls Humanity a ‘Disease’ in UN Climate Speech
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The chorus advocating climate change awareness has built in unprecedented numbers as of late, and has now gained the unmistakable baritone of superstar actor Jason Momoa. Momoa, who spoke in front of the United Nations’ Small Islands Event on September 27, told world leaders that they were failing to do what’s needed to stave off climate change. But he didn’t place all the blame on them; he also made clear that humanity itself is “a disease that is infecting our planet.”

The six-minute speech the Aquaman actor gave, shown in full in the clip above, is shockingly direct and, as with almost everything that’s reported about climate change these days, quite devastating. Momoa used his full speech to lambast politicians and corporations for seeking short-term profits over the long-term wellbeing of Earth. “Our ego, our fear, and our relentless drive for profits have made us the only species willing to force disharmony with the natural balance of our world,” Momoa stated, adding that he was ashamed of leaders who hadn’t yet embraced the the Paris Agreement.

Momoa speaking in front of the UN’s Small Islands Event makes perfect sense. The world-famous actor, known for playing Khal Drogo on Game of Thrones as well as Aquaman on the big screen, was born in Honolulu, Hawaii, but raised by his mother in Iowa. This unique upbringing gave Momoa “a foothold in two worlds,” and enabled him “to see how a problem for one will soon become a problem for all.” The way he learned to see the world, as an island with limited resources floating amongst an ocean of stars, not only gives insight into the way he’s approaching the monumental climate crisis, but also serves as a good metaphor for how everybody should be thinking about the planet.

The speech particularly emphasized the damaging effects humanity exerts on the oceans. Momoa noted that the garbage patch floating in the Pacific Ocean has grown larger than France, and added that we’ve developed a “devastating crisis of plastic pollution.”

There was almost no slack given in the speech, which echoed much of what Greta Thunberg touched on during her appearance at the UN’s Climate Action Summit on September 23. But while their messages were in sync, Momoa’s final clarion call took on a more paternal tone. “We can no longer afford the luxury of half-assing [our movement toward a sustainable way of life],” Momoa said, “as we willingly force ourselves beyond the threshold of no return.”

What do you think of Momoa’s UN speech? And how do you think it compares to Thunberg’s? Let us know in the comments!

Images: United Nations