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Steak vs Molten Aluminum is Not the Mismatch You’d Imagine

You might expect a well-done piece of blackened char to end up on your plate if you cooked your steak in molten aluminum, but in reality you’d have to send it back to the chef for being under-cooked. It turns out when the two meet, it is not the lopsided affair you might expect.

The Backyard Scientist is back with another edition of pouring molten aluminum on to various things. We’ve seen what you get when you pour molten aluminum into melons (strangely beautiful art pieces), but because everyone is worried he’s going to hurt himself one of these days, he decided to see what kind of damage the liquid metal can do to tissue.

Enter the steak.

While you definitely don’t want to get molten aluminum on you, it really didn’t damage the steak as badly as you would imagine. It mostly flowed right off of it like a stream of water on plastic, and while it browned the surface, it didn’t go much deeper.

Because that result was unexpected, he then tried cooking a steak in a pan of liquid tin, but that was just as surprising. The steak just floated on top of it and cooked, and even then the inside was essentially raw. Now, you wouldn’t want to eat the steak, since it still ends up with lots of small pieces of metal on it (though a lot less than you would have hypothesized), but it just looks and smells like a cooked steak.

Steak-liquid-metal

Even fun, silly experiments can teach us a lot. Science!

What should he pour molten aluminum on to next? Give your best ideas in the comments below.

Images: The backyard Scientist/YouTube

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