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Music Dispatch: Radiohead’s ‘OK Computer’ to be Included in the Library of Congress

Music Dispatch: Radiohead’s ‘OK Computer’ to be Included in the Library of Congress

Some days, your mind is to drawn to the music at hand, and you just can’t think of a clever intro to Music Dispatch. In situations like that, it’s best just to jump right in. Today, we have an interactive music video from Unknown Mortal Orchestraa surprise Kendrick Lamar concert, and a new benchmark for Radiohead’s OK Computer.


Earl Sweatshirt, who is still bitter about Columbia botching his I Don’t Like Shit, I Don’t Go Outside album release, jumped on a track with Mr. Wonderful (aka the prolific Action Bronson). Produced by joint producing collaborator, the Alchemist, “Warlord Leather” is described as a bonus track to celebrate both artists’ new albums. [Pitchfork]


Unknown Mortal Orchestra send us on a psychedelic trip through a kaleidoscopic screen-saver of a world, in the music video for the title track of their forthcoming Multi-Love album. The digital space of the video can also be explored through an interactive app, available for PC, Mac, and Unity. The video’s director describes it as a representation of “the vacuum of space by impressing upon inter-dimensional unfolding, immaterial objects, and time-driven reverberation of events.” Right, of course. [Pitchfork]


That description could just as well be used to describe the new video from Andrea Balency, by way of Dazed. The track is “Waterfalls” and her now released EP is Volcano. 

Radiohead’s OK Computer is being included in the Library of Congress for it’s cultural significance. Matt Barton, curator of the Library of Congress, “I see it as part of a certain ongoing phenomenon in rock music that maybe begins with The Velvet Underground but also The Doors, who are on the registry this year. Pop music is not entirely positive in its outlook, shall we say. I think we can say that OK Computer really sums a lot of that up.” Also among this year’s 25 entrees into the registry was Ben E. King’s “Stand By Me”, The Righteous Brothers’ “You’ve Lost That Loving Feelin'”, The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, Steve Martin’s A Wild and Crazy Guy, Sesame Street’s All-Time Platinum Favorites, and Joan Baez’s self-titled 1960 album. [Consequence of Sound]

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Indie darlings, Parquet Courts, have made an announcement that will surely be good for business at all Brooklyn tattoo parlors. This morning, the band posted on their website: “Got a Parquet Courts tattoo? What the hell were you thinking? In order to shelter your fragile soul from the sting of deep, venomous regret, Parquet Courts are going to allow you free entrance, for life, into any Parquet Courts show*.” I wonder if this means they are breaking up. [Stereogum]


One of the more bizarre stories at the intersection of music and fashion from this year involves budget designer fashion chain, H&M, releasing a line of heavy metal-inspired clothing, many of the shirts and jackets featuring album artwork for made-up bands. While that, in and of itself, is not all the bizarre or surprising (especially for a controversial brand whose success has been due largely in part to the lack of copyright protections regarding fashion); after all, a knockoff Def Leppard is just as good as a knockoff Dior, amirite? Where the story gets interesting is when a previously unknown “Swedish underground metal promotional agency,” calling itself Strong Scene Productions, sent out a press release to the MetalSucks insisting all of H&M’s bands were entirely legit and influential rock legends from days of yore (“before the age digital music”). For reference, Strong Scene linked to a brand new YouTube page, featuring a bundle of very bad music and convincingly plentiful album art. The metal community was understandably quite peeved with H&M, to say the least, for attempting to clandestinely pull wool over their mascara’d eyes. What’s more, some of the fake band material suggested a couple of the bands were linked to the National Socialist black metal scene. Yes, Neo-nazi neo-metal. And, of course, many believed it, because H&M is prone to exactly these types of mistakes (Exactly a year ago, they took heat for selling THIS). But, alas, this was all an elaborate and hilarious hoax by Finntroll guitarist Henri Sorvali and friends, and a clever response to H&M’s habit of culturally appropriating fashion campaigns. Well played, Sorvali. Well played. [Metal Injection]

Kendrick Lamar, whose To Pimp a Butterfly, broke Spotify’s single-day streaming record by nearly three million plays, is still working hard to promote his album. Like a politician on the campaign trail, Lamar took to the streets of his hometown, Los Angeles, last night, giving a surprise concert on the back of a rolling flatbed semi-truck. Starting along the Sunset Strip, the moving concert headed towards Melrose, followed by a couple hundred smart-phone-wielding fans. [Consequence of Sound]

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