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Drool With Us Over Jack and the Cuckoo-Clock Heart

Drool With Us Over Jack and the Cuckoo-Clock Heart

We haven’t met a fictional world we wanted to step inside of quite like this one since Tim Burton took us to the holiday towns of Nightmare Before Christmas. Get ready to reach out and touch the screen of your computer as you take in the gorgeousness that is Jack and the Cuckoo-Clock Heart.

We can’t decide what we love more: the beautiful animation, the circus-like atmosphere (does anyone else get a little Big Fish feeling?) or the music. The story revolves around Jack whose heart was frozen on the day of his birth and replaced with a cuckoo-clock. Because of the delicate apparatus keeping him going, he lives by only three rules: never touch the hands of the clock; control his temper at all times; and most heartbreakingly, never fall in love. Any massive emotion could stop his clock and thus end his life. As with all fairy tales, these rules all go out the window when he falls in love with a young singer on a street corner, and he is off on an adventure that will take him all over Europe. This trailer and the coming English version release features the voices of Game of Thrones’s Michelle Fairley, Les Miserables’Samantha Barks, and Orlando Seale.

Jack and the Cuckoo-Clock Heart is based on a novel written by Dionysos’s lead singer, Mathias Malzieu. He helmed the adaptation and worked with music video director Stéphane Berla to bring it to life on screen in their feature debut. Previously only released in France, Shout! Factory will release the English version on October 7. We might have already pre-ordered it after watching the trailer a billion times.

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Comments

  1. Saw this movie recently in its French version, it had the cleverest puns and use of homophones ever. Hope this makes it some way or another into the English translation, really made it all the way more enjoyable.

    • Jacka says:

      The English dialogue feels kind of stilted and oddly paced, presumably because it needed to fit the lip movements of the original animation. I suspect the original French might be the best way to enjoy this film.Whatever the case, it’s certainly a nice thing to look at.

      • Rachael Berkey says:

        Aw man I wish I spoke/understood French! It’s one of those things I have on a bucket list! (Why can’t I just download it to my brain!?)