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British Mad Scientist Gives Himself Real Iceman Powers

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! No…it’s Colin Furze once again giving himself the closest thing to superpowers with the power of science!

In madman/engineer Colin Furze’s latest video, which you can watch above, the Brit has built himself a functioning glove that can freeze objects like the X-Men member known as Iceman. His first idea was to use compressed carbon dioxide like you’d find exiting a fire extinguisher — when gas under high pressure exits a small opening quickly it rapidly decreases in temperature — but it wasn’t cold enough. To really embody Iceman, targets would have to be frozen quickly. Furze settled on liquid nitrogen, which bubbles at a cool -321 degrees Fahrenheit (-196 degrees Celsius).

Working with such a frigid liquid comes with its own particular engineering challenges. For example, you can simply pump liquid nitrogen with ordinary plastic tubing because the tubing will quickly freeze and shatter. If you want to see the entire design process went through, Furze posted a video detailing everything he had to overcome:

In the end, Furze did in fact make a gauntlet worthy of Iceman. Taking aim at some grass, Furze lifts his wrist (a tilt sensor on the gauntlet detects a change in slope, and activates the air pump) and fires out ice. Or rather, mostly super cold nitrogen gas. It looks like most of the liquid form had boiled away by the time it met the target. Still, the grass shattered, a flower crumbled, and a glass of water froze solid.

Furze has created a number of real-world analogs for X-Men powers, including Magneto’s and Pyro’s. You can check them all out at his YouTube channel here.

Images: Colin Furze

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