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May 8 2018 -- 12:54 AM

Alot happens in Star Wars: The Last Jedi. There are multiple space battles, huge losses on both sides, a bundle of great story beats and general galactic adventure.

But in its quieter and more intimate moments Rian Johnson’s gorgeous film finally deals with one of the most troubling aspects of the Star Wars universe: the abusive relationships between student and master that so much of the whole galaxy seems to hinge on.

From Obi-Wan and Yoda’s insistence to keep Luke in the dark about the identity of his father (lest we forget that Yoda literally died to protect that secret) whom they both wanted him to kill, to Palpatine’s desperate manipulations of Anakin that led to the fall of the galaxy and the death of his beloved Padmé, Star Wars movie canon is filled with destructive relationships that almost always seem to end in tragedy.

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These partnerships have become so iconic in their strangeness that they’re a cultural touchstone all of their own, with many fans wondering (half jokingly) out loud whether Obi-Wan and Yoda are just as bad as their Dark Side counterparts due to their constant “necessary” lies.

Luke is a product of the abusive cycle of the Jedi. At a young age, he was trained to fight in a war he knew barely anything about. He was lied to, indoctrinated, and manipulated to kill his own father.

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But in its quieter and more intimate moments Rian Johnson’s gorgeous film finally deals with one of the most troubling aspects of the Star Wars universe: the abusive relationships between student and master that so much of the whole galaxy seems to hinge on.

From Obi-Wan and Yoda’s insistence to keep Luke in the dark about the identity of his father (lest we forget that Yoda literally died to protect that secret) whom they both wanted him to kill, to Palpatine’s desperate manipulations of Anakin that led to the fall of the galaxy and the death of his beloved Padmé, Star Wars movie canon is filled with destructive relationships that almost always seem to end in tragedy.

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Abrams could decide that it would make for a stronger conclusion if Rey’s parents do have ties to major characters
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So it’s hardly surprising that when he sees his young nephew unbelievably strong with the Force, he can’t think of anything other than training him and securing his legacy as a Jedi master. Such is the nature of abusive relationships; we often can’t help but repeat them, or at the very least find it incredibly hard to leave them.

Demo Footnote This is a test footnote to demonstrate the footnote functionality. It works on any article template. One can setup multiple footnotes on multiple focused keyword like this one.

Luke’s relationship with the Jedi order is a complex one, and yet when we find him at the beginning of The Last Jedi he seems to have finally extricated himself from the organization that’s caused him so much pain. And what was it that finally allowed him to cut himself off from the Jedi?

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His own abuse of his former student and nephew Ben Solo, of course. Luke could barely stand to see what his momentary lapse in faith had wrought on his nephew and the galaxy. The reality of Luke’s moment of weakness is that it was simply that, a moment. But to the child who was in his care, who trusted him and needed his guidance, all Ben saw was the man who was supposed to guide him instead about to strike him down with a lightsaber.

But in its quieter and more intimate moments Rian Johnson’s gorgeous film finally deals with one of the most troubling aspects of the Star Wars universe: the abusive relationships between student and master that so much of the galaxy seems to hinge on.

From Obi-Wan and Yoda’s insistence to keep Luke in the dark about the identity of his father (lest we forget that Yoda literally died to protect that secret) whom they both wanted him to kill, to Palpatine’s desperate manipulations of Anakin that led to the fall of the galaxy and the death of his beloved Padmé, Star Wars movie canon is filled with destructive relationships that almost always seem to end in tragedy.

Luke is a product of the abusive cycle of the Jedi. At a young age, he was trained to fight in a war he knew barely anything about. He was lied to, indoctrinated, and manipulated to kill his own father.

So it’s hardly surprising that when he sees his young nephew unbelievably strong with the Force, he can’t think of anything other than training him and securing his legacy as a Jedi master. Such is the nature of abusive relationships; we often can’t help but repeat them, or at the very least find it incredibly hard to leave them.

Luke’s relationships with the Jedi order is a complex one, and yet when we find him at the beginning of The Last Jedi he seems to have finally extricated himself from the organization that’s caused him so much pain. And what was it that finally allowed him to cut himself off from the Jedi?

His own abuse of his former student and nephew Ben Solo, of course. Luke could barely stand to see what his momentary lapse in faith had wrought on his nephew and the galaxy. The reality of Luke’s moment of weakness is that it was simply that, a moment. But to the child who was in his care, who trusted him and needed his guidance, all Ben saw was the man who was supposed to guide him instead about to strike him down with a lightsaber.

Luke is a product of the abusive cycle of the Jedi. At a young age, he was trained to fight in a war he knew barely anything about. He was lied to, indoctrinated, and manipulated to kill his own father.

So it’s hardly surprising that when he sees his young nephew unbelievably strong with the Force, he can’t think of anything other than training him and securing his legacy as a Jedi master. Such is the nature of abusive relationships; we often can’t help but repeat them, or at the very least find it incredibly hard to leave them. or at the very least find it incredibly hard to leave them.

Luke is a product of the abusive cycle of the Jedi. At a young age, he was trained to fight in a war he knew barely anything about. He was lied to, indoctrinated, and manipulated to kill his own father.

So it’s hardly surprising that when he sees his young nephew unbelievably strong with the Force,

Luke is a product of the abusive cycle of the Jedi. At a young age, he was trained to fight in a war he knew barely anything about. He was lied to, indoctrinated, and manipulated to kill his own father.

So it’s hardly surprising that when he sees his young nephew unbelievably strong with the Force, he can’t think of anything other than training him and securing his legacy as a Jedi master. Such is the nature of abusive relationships; we often can’t help but repeat them, or at the very least find it incredibly hard to leave them.