YouTuber North of the Border is back with more creepy sculptures of beloved childhood classics. If Experiment 626 is the chaotic but lovable Stitch we know and love, this alarming version must be one of Dr. Jumba’s 625 previous experiments. Even without including the extra arms, antenna, and spines Stitch’s body originally has in Lilo & Stitch, every detail the artist does add is pretty horrifying. There’s the muscular gorilla body, plaque on the sharp teeth, and bear-like claws. Sure, he’s ‘ohana (which, as you probably know, means family), but maybe it would be better for everyone if this creepy statue gets left behind or forgotten.

There’s not a lot of cute and cuddly art on the North of the Border YouTube channel. But the artist is great at explaining his process if you want to recreate this monstrosity for yourself. He includes lists of materials and tools in the video’s description so there’s nothing but good sense to stop you. Other than the basic clay and paint, some of those materials really add depth and detail. There’s static grass for fur and glue for the drool dripping from his maw. It’s not mentioned in the video above, but we wouldn’t be surprised if this abomination is also bulletproof, fireproof, and can move things 3,000 times his size just like Experiment 626. He certainly looks like he could steal more than just everyone’s left shoe. 

North of the Border

North of the Border recently made another so-called realistic sculpture of a beloved character. Like Stitch, Pikachu also ends up with more muscles and anger than the well-known cartoon version. There’s plenty of other videos the artist has made in an attempt to ruin childhoods and cause nightmares. You’ll never unsee zombified Minions, a terrifyingly toothy Kirby, and what a LEGO minifigure would look like in real life. At least he’s Canadian enough to apologize for the monstrosities he unleashes, rather than laughing maniacally like Dr. Jumba.

Melissa is Nerdist’s science & technology staff writer. She also moderates “science of” panels at conventions and co-hosts Star Warsologies, a podcast about science and Star Wars. Follow her on Twitter @melissatruth.