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BudapestThere’s never anything better than a Wes Anderson movie trailer. The acclaimed director, and fan of diorama-style framing, is back with his follow-up to the Oscar-nominated Moonrise Kingdom: The Grand Budapest Hotel. It’s a period piece more so than any other film the whimsical storyteller has given us, taking place at a swanky European hotel between the World Wars.

Ralph Fiennes stars as Gustave H., the concierge of the establishment and an incorrigible Lothario, who gets wrapped up in a murder plot when one of his older conquests (a made-up Tilda Swinton) winds up dead. The rest of the cast seems like a who’s who of Anderson players like Owen Wilson, Willem Dafoe, Jason Schwartzman, Jeff Goldblum, Edward Norton, and Bill Murray with the additions of folks like Jude Law, F. Murray Abraham, Harvey Keitel, and Saoirse Ronan.

The movie looks right in the Anderson wheelhouse, which means I’ll probably love it. The film’s set to be released sometime in 2014. What do you think? Do you pick up what Wes is putting down or are you tired of the old song & dance? Let us know in them there comments.


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  2. Aaron says:

    I am SO on board. I get chills watching that trailer. I’ve delighted in every one of his films from Bottle Rocket on! I will be encouraging everyone I know to see this.

  3. RG says:

    I sometimes feel like the twee-ness is getting a little out of hand, especially with Moonrise Kingdom. In every film up until that one, there was always a subtle, lingering scene where each character finally turned from a caricature into a real person, and that stuck with the character throughout the film and made things feel real. Moonrise Kingdom didn’t really have that, and the subtlety kinda crossed over into blankness for me. Then again, maybe that’s the point (there weren’t many characters who actually cared about the kids, and Wes Anderson’s way of vilifying characters is to keep them in their unemotional cocoon of twee-ness).

    So I’m hopeful… but a few more slow-motion closeups with swelling music, Tenenbaums-style, would be a welcome way of re-injecting a little emotion into the mix.

  4. Beth Rodgers says:

    I am so excited!